Drilling Down to Social Strategies

Our fourth Analytics class focused on the first of two parts on analytics for social media. This first part highlighted facebook, twitter and LinkedIn in terms of what users can do on these sites and “how” you can use these platforms to measure online, as well as offline, initiatives.

As with all analytics, you need to identify your SMART goals, KPIs, metrics and measurement methods in advance to ensure you capture all the relevant data and don’t waste time or lose important stats.

I think it’s interesting to note that if you are running a campaign that includes an offline tactic (e.g. a coupon or redeemable voucher), you can measure its impact online — IF you plan in advance.  The reverse also applies. For example, you can measure the offline response of a Facebook ad by using “offer claims.”

For this week’s in class exercise, we had to develop a social media strategy for promoting Parks Canada’s “Unplugged” campaign. For this, we had to identify SMART Goals and tactics for achieving them, as well as KPIs and metrics to measure progress.  I found this exercise a little confusing because we had just learned that traditionally KPIs are metrics that relate directly to your goals and generally impact the business.  Specifically, KPIs traditionally apply to revenue-related metrics (e.g. cost per lead, return on invest) or direct conversions that impact the business (new memberships).  However, I learned that the KPIs for a social media campaign are an exception to this. That is, they are social, as are the SMART Goals that support the campaign (e.g. generating X number of tweets with a specific hashtag).  This is good to note, as ‘when’ I launch my senior project, I will likely do it with a social campaign to drive traffic to the site and ideally generate conversions (member sign-ups).

In the exercise, we had to create a strategy for Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. The first two were straightforward, as the campaign was consumer-facing, which both Facebook and Twitter can be.  However, LinkedIn forced us to think ‘outside the box’ as it’s more of a B2B channel.  This was a challenge but good because sometimes clients decide they want to use a specific social media channel and you need to find a way to make it relevant to your marketing needs.

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